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   Table of Contents - Current issue
Coverpage
January-June 2021
Volume 1 | Issue 1
Page Nos. 1-34

Online since Thursday, January 28, 2021

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EDITORIALS  

From the editorial desk p. 1
Ravindran Chetambath, V Rajesh, AR Paramez, Safreena Mohamed, Kiran Vishnu Narayan
DOI:10.4103/jalh.jalh_12_20  
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How do we manage chronic respiratory diseases during this pandemic? p. 2
Ravindran Chetambath, Jesin Kumar
DOI:10.4103/jalh.jalh_6_20  
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REVIEW ARTICLE Top

Imaging features of COVID-19 pneumonia p. 5
Charitha Puvvada, Ravindran Chetambath
DOI:10.4103/jalh.jalh_9_20  
Coronavirus disease 2019 after its origin in Wuhan, China, had spread globally and was declared as a pandemic by the WHO on March 11, 2020.? The WHO identifies it as a controllable pandemic with the key role existing in precautionary measures to curb the recent global crisis. The current diagnostic methodologies include the rapid antigen test, serology tests to detect antibodies, and the real-time polymerase chain reaction.? Anecdotal experiences have shown that imaging characteristics are crucial in the diagnosis and management of the disease as radiological evidence of disease appears before the clinical manifestations and evolves overtime as the disease progresses, which is useful in predicting the stage, severity, and prognosis of the disease. Owing to few specific features and early changes, computed tomography scan is more sensitive than a chest roentgenogram in highlighting these changes.
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE Top

Prevalence of bronchial asthma among students of 16–20 years' age group in a South Indian City p. 10
Irfan A Sheik, M Vishnu Sharma
DOI:10.4103/jalh.jalh_3_20  
Background: The prevalence of asthma has been increasing worldwide in recent years. There is a wide variation in the prevalence of asthma in various countries, varying between 1.2% and 6.3% among adults in most countries. There is a scarcity of data on the prevalence of asthma in the age group 16–20 years in India. Objective: The aim is to study the prevalence of asthma among students of 16–20 years' age group in our city. Methodology: This was a questionnaire-based cross-sectional study. A standardized questionnaire was prepared and distributed to 4600 college students. Among the students who had symptoms suggestive of asthma by the questionnaire method, 10% of them were selected for spirometry to confirm the diagnosis by a systemic random sampling method. Statistical analysis was performed using frequency and percentage method to calculate the prevalence. Chi-square test, odds ratio, and 95% confidence interval were used to measure the association between the variables, and a value of P < 0.05 was considered to be significant. Results: Out of 4600 students, 1539 (33.5%) were boys and 3061 (66.5%) were girls. 230 (5.0%) students had symptoms suggestive of bronchial asthma, of which 115 (7.5%) were boys and 115 (3.8%) were girls. 336 (7.3%) students had a family history of asthma. Out of 230 students having symptoms suggestive of asthma, only 57 (24.78%) students were taking regular medications, in which 34 (59.64%) students had symptomatic relief. The prevalence of bronchial asthma among college students (16–20) years of age was 5.0%. A family history of asthma was associated with significantly higher odds of having bronchial asthma. Conclusions: The prevalence of asthma among students of 16–20 years ago was 5.0%. A family history of asthma was associated with significantly higher odds of having bronchial asthma.
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CASE REPORTS Top

Subacute invasive pulmonary aspergillosis p. 19
Ravindran Chetambath
DOI:10.4103/jalh.jalh_4_20  
Subacute invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) is an indolent cavitating infectious process which can mimic other chronic lung infections such as tuberculosis. This usually occurs in mildly immunosuppressed individuals and clinically evolves over weeks to months. Radiological presentation is in the form of thick-walled cavity with or without mycetoma, fibrosis, and pleural invasion. Here, a case of subacute IPA in a middle-aged female with rheumatoid arthritis is reported, highlighting a rare radiological appearance.
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Bilateral congenital pulmonary airway malformation in an adult: Report of a rare case p. 23
Ravindran Chetambath, Jesin Kumar, Sanjeev Shivashankaran
DOI:10.4103/jalh.jalh_1_20  
Congenital pulmonary airway malformations (CPAMs) are considered part of a spectrum of bronchopulmonary foregut malformations. Diagnosis is usually made during the antenatal or neonatal period, and is rarely diagnosed in adults. The spectrum of clinical presentations varies from asymptomatic cases to recurrent respiratory tract infections or respiratory insufficiency in adulthood. Here, we report the case of an adult female who presented with a history of recurrent respiratory tract infections since childhood. Radiological findings were in favor of bilateral CPAM. Bilateral CPAM in an adult patient is extremely rare, and it is mostly managed as bronchiectasis.
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IMAGE REVIEW Top

Radiology pearl p. 26
Vishnu Sharma, K Shruthi
DOI:10.4103/jalh.jalh_2_20  
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EXPERT VIEW Top

Bleeding cysts in the lungs – A clinicians' dilemma!! p. 28
Sanjeev Shivashankaran
DOI:10.4103/jalh.jalh_10_20  
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POSTGRADUATE FORUM Top

Rapidly progressive dyspnea in an elderly diabetic p. 31
Nithish M Bhandary, Vishnu Sharma, SN Megha
DOI:10.4103/jalh.jalh_5_20  
Breathlessness is a common presenting symptom in the emergency room. Focused history, clinical examination, and proper stepwise evaluations are essential for early diagnosis and treatment. The most common presenting feature of nCovid19 pneumonia is rapidly progressive breathlessness. During this pandemic, we need to differentiate nCovid19 pneumonia from other causes for breathlessness. Here, we discuss the differential diagnosis for rapidly progressive breathlessness, how to evaluate a patient with suspected nCovid19 pneumonia and the role of chest computed tomography scan in nCovid19.
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